Home Owners must take responsibility

A startling fact was provided to a small group of home owners in Goodwood and surrounding suburbs at the wildlife preservation presentation at Goodwood Primary School on Thursday night.

That was the revelation that it is us, those who own property in the area known as the City of Unley, who are responsible for the loss of native fauna and flora. As the map below shows very little is owned or under the control of governments, whether Federal, State or Local. The remaining 61% is owned by you and me. And before you say it does not add up to 100, roads account for the other 23%.

The areas in pink on this map are you and me.

After the original settlement of Unley most of the blocks were built on only to around 30%. In recent times the larger blocks have been carved up and we are covering regularly 50%, 60% and even up to 70% with housing stock.

This invasion is long before the recent invasion by DPTI of the electrified rail corridor.

DPTI, to their credit, were a key stakeholder in the recent wildlife project along the corridor. Before the project started they listed the expertise of Zoologist James Smith (see previous Wildlife post) with their concerns about wildlife degradation.

Council has information for anyone who wishes to do their bit to help our local environment. Or ring DPTI on 1300 443 198

Attracting Native Wildlife to YOUR garden

Goodwood Primary School students gave a presentation along with James Smith, Zoologist and founder of fauNature, as to how we might not only protect our native fauna and flora but increase it within the boundaries of the City of Unley.

The presentation was at the School and was most informative. The students of this school, and indeed nearby Black Forest primary School have been leading the way in nature preservation. We can all be proud that our little neck of the woods are so proactive.

Part of the promotion covered how both schools have been helping to reduce the impacts of habitat loss along the rail corridor. This project was done in conjunction with DPTI, City of Unley and the Toys workshop at the Clarence Park Community Centre.

This project fits neatly into Councils Greening component of our Strategic Plan (from the Community of Possibilities).

Our future is in the hands of these young people, which is encouraging. I jut hope we don’t blow it before they get to influence directly.

The message has to get out there that we (you and me) are responsible for the future. We cant blame governments. Look for my next post on this.

Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep

Last night I heard my momma singin’ a song, cooee, chirpy, chirpy, cheep,cheep.

Where’s our trees gone might be the song we have been singing for the last 12 months. But now we can sing and rejoice the birds are coming back, thanks to DPTI, Council and our local school kids.

While we await replanting of lost trees (on a three for one basis) and aware of the impact these works of the impact that the Rail Revitalisation Project has had on flora within the western suburbs of the City of Unley, DPTI and Council have worked collaboratively on a Community Wildlife Project to provide nesting boxes through neighbouring streets, schools and private properties adjacent the rail corridor. Fundamentally the aim of the project was to provide alternative nesting sites for fauna that may have been displaced by the loss of vegetation, specifically trees from the rail projects.
DPTI worked with a Zoologist (James Smith) who teamed with schools within the area to build nesting boxes. This Community Wildlife Project was enthusiastically embraced by the community. This includes the kids of the Black Forest and Goodwood Primary Schools, Clarence Park Community Centre T.O.Y.S. Workshop (who provided the workshop for the kids to make the nesting boxes) and numerous other volunteers have all been valuable contributors, ensuring the environmental and educational outcomes sort have been achieved

The boxes have been placed in trees near the rail corridor (Goodwood Primary School, Forestville Reserve, Black Forest School, Devon Street & Railway Terrace, Lyons Parade, Cromer Parade and Goodwood Oval). The Council has supported this project and agreed to take on board the longer term maintenance of these boxes. In total 42 fauna boxes are located in trees near the corridor as part of this project.

Council already has 52 boxes located throughout the rest of the City (predominately to the east of the City). With the additional 42 provided from this project we are now close to 100 fauna boxes throughout the City.

Goodwood Art House brings out the Heavies

The second annual Pop-up Gallery was opened tonight at the Goodwood Art House (viz a viz the Goodwood Primary School) by none other than the State Premier Jay Weatherill.

The west of Unley again was the place to be as the Premier was accompanied by the Federal Member for Adelaide and Shadow Minister for Education Kate Ellis (who is now a local of the west of Unley), the State Local Member for Ashford Steph Key, the State Member for Unley and shadow Minister for Education David Pisoni, and the Liberal Candidate for Ashford Terina Monteagle.

Council, who provided funding under the 2013 Festival & Events community funding to assist with the costs of staging and marketing, where represented by the Mayor, Cr Anthony Lapidge and myself.

The event is showcasing artwork from community members, both amateur and professional, with every student of Goodwood Primary School contributing a piece of art.

The crowd tonight was a great celebration and demonstrates the true Goodwood community spirit.

I recommend you get along and check it out, maybe on the way home from the pageant. The event will run from today through to Sunday.