The extended use of the lighting at Goodwood Oval confuses Grandstand consultation

Hopefully a development application for the extended use of the lighting at Goodwood Oval does not hinder the Grandstand Redevelopment.

 

A development application for extended use of the lighting at Goodwood Oval has been submitted to Council. The timing of this application by the Goodwood Saints Football Club is poor. It will run concurrently with the consultation on the new Goodwood Oval Grandstand.

This is therefore not healthy, and I suggest poor timing by the Goodwood Saints.

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

First of all, public consultation on the Grandstand is essential to achieving good design. As a result we look to our community to contribute to the design and to take ownership of the design.

Extended use of the lighting is a totally separate project. The Development Regulations deem this as development.

It requires public notification, in this case a category 3 notification. Hence public involvement in this process is not one of contributing to the final design. It is one of representing (positively or negatively) on the suitability of a predetermined design by the applicant. Cat 3 notifications means anyone can submit a representation to the Panel.

Our Council Assessment Panel (CAP) will assess the application. The Regulations require this.

This is not just a social issue. It is an infrastructure issue. Council itself will be providing a submission to the CAP. This will focus on the Oval’s ability to handle any extra use resulting from the extended use of the lighting.

 

Clashing with the Grandstand Consultation

With the history of opposition to the extended use of the lighting, the application is surely poorly timed.

It has the potential to cause a backlash on the Goodwood Oval Grandstand design. My earlier blog expands on what we are looking to achieve together on the Grandstand. The extended use of the lighting is a what do you think about this.

Hence I implore anyone wanting to have a say to separate the two. My earlier blog focuses on the Grandstand redevelopment.

You can provide a submission on either or both. Therefore, your choice.

Seeking Your Feedback on Goodwood Oval Grandstand

Council is seeking your feedback on draft designs we have recently developed for the new Goodwood Oval Grandstand. After consultation with the footy and cricket clubs to ensure we have captured their needs, we now seek your input.

As everyone knows, we received Government funding late last year. Their contribution added to our own commitment and the contribution of the clubs and the SANFL.

This therefore means the project will proceed. That is a non-negotiable.

What we need now is to develop and refine the concept designs. To ensure the new facility fits in with the local environment we look forward to the contribution from the wider community. Seeking your feedback will assist the final design.

Discussions I have had neighbours have identified a couple of suggestions that I believe will improve the design. Both aesthetically and functionally. A question has also been raised as to the availability of function area to the community. Another whether the change rooms might be available to others who may hire the oval. I like that too.

Please contribute. Your input may prove to be just as helpful. You can help by going to our have your say website.

At the same time, we are seeking further input from the SANFL and the AFL. They have made observations that will positively impact on the size and cost of the project. Such observations as the number of toilets can be reduced and physio space likewise reduced.

Extended Use of Lighting

Hopefully a development application before council for extended use of lighting by the Goodwood Saints Football Club will not detract from helping us achieve the best design.

The lighting use has nothing to do with this consultation. Council, must under the Development Regulations, process this application. Our Council Assessment Panel will assess the application.

Please do not mix the two. We need your feedback to the grandstand design. If you have an interest in the lighting please refer to my separate bog.

 

Kate Bickford is representing SA Best in the fight for Badcoe.

Representing SA Best, Kate Bickford is the last candidate to be named in the Fight for Badcoe. This just before the Government goes into caretaker mode and the core flutes get erected.

Kate Bickford, SA Best candidate for Badcoe

As I have done with the other three candidates I sat down with Kate Bickford for a coffee and a chat. This I did on behalf of the ratepayers of Council’s Clarence Park Ward, and the neighbouring Goodwood Ward.

I found her to be quite a genuine person with strong links to the local community. She has lived around 20 years in Forestville.

>>>>>>

Kate is a lawyer and has worked on behalf of our indigenous Australians and for small and big business. This has seen her interact at all levels with Government.

What kate Bickford stands for.

I gleaned from her a concern many of you know I share about the future of South Road. What will be the redesigned South Road through Black Forest when the Government finally gets around to our section of the non-stop carriage way.

She is also keen to ensure balanced improvement to planning laws. Again, something that readers of this website know I share.

Kate indicated also that she is keen to see more work done in the ageing arena, including providing ways of bringing the aged and the young together. Sounds like she would really like the City of Unley Active Ageing project.

Another passion she has, which a number of you have indicated to me is a concern. That is to bring back safety gates to the pedestrian accesses and to improved DDA compliant ramps at the many rail stations we have in the City of Unley. Something my wife and I put to the liberals some time back.

This completes my initial interactions with all the candidates. If you wish to remember my initial observations of the other three you can check at here for Jayne Stinson (Labor), Lachlan Clyne (Liberal) and John Woodward (Independent).

You can contact Kate Bickford via email at [email protected]est.org.au or call her on 0434 673 794 and arrange to meet with her to discuss any issue that concerns you in Badcoe. To view Kate’s electorate page, click here.

Council is seen in a good light according to a new survey.

Council is seen in a good light according to a recent survey we conducted. Or at least our collective Community centres.

The results of our 2017 Community Centre Customer Satisfaction Survey, undertaken in October, have been collated. 143 respondents, which is 102 more than 2016.  With the results of the survey below Council is seen in a good light:
 
– 87% said our customer service and support is either good or very good.
– 90% said our price/affordability is either good or very good.
– 80% said our range of programs was either good or very good.
– 87% said our range of information available was either good or very good.
– 89% said our facilities are either good or very good for what they need.
I don’t know how many of the responses came for the Clarence Park Community Centre, around the corner from me. I am sure they rate as highly, if not more highly, than the other three Community Centres. 
Some achievements from 2017 include
 
  • Our school holiday programs were extremely popular again across 2017 with most activities booking out across FPCC and CPCC.
  • Unley Community Centre was host to the 2017 ‘Zest Fest’ and saw 96 participants attend its High Tea celebration.
  • Clarence Park Community Centre was again ‘host’ the Premier’s Cabinet meeting in 2017.  This has proven to be a great opportunity to showcase local community programs and services available at the Centre.
  • Continued delivery of free or subsidised programs supported by State Government (DCSI) funding to run the very popular Aquacise and ‘Cooking 101’ at Unley Community Centre, the youth drop-in service and parenting seminars attended by hundreds of local families at Fullarton Park, and the very busy Playgroup at Clarence Park.
 
We are looking forward to another busy year ahead with a range of diverse activities and programs to engage our local community. Please refer to the 2018 Community Centres program available on our website for more detail.

The State Commission Assessment Panel not a rubber stamp

News fresh at hand would suggest the State Commission Assessment panel is not a rubber stamp. I have just received advice on there most recent decision. The new proposed Cremorne Plaza development has been deferred.

At their recent meeting they resolved as follows:

The State Commission Assessment Panel resolved to defer consideration of the proposal by Future Urban Group for DA 090/M008/17 at 244-246 Unley Road, Unley subject to the receipt of amended plans and documentation in relation to the following:
·          A review of the height of the development in the context of the planning policy and surrounding character of the area.
·          A review of overlooking impacts.
·          A review of the amenity of the south facing apartments and balconies in light of potential development to the south of the property.
·          A review of the visual bulk of the building.
·          Further examination of the finishes and materials proposed particularly on the podium.
·          A review of the parking provisions in light of the loss of available street parking arrangements on Hart Avenue, and the shortfall of carparks on site related to the provision of retail space.
·          A review of the Unley Road frontage and the Unley Road/Hart Avenue corner of the site to ensure feasible activation of the ground floor and public realm, especially as the outdoor dining area is unlikely to be supported by Council and DPTI Transport’s requirement for a 4.5m by 4.5m corner cutoff, under the Metropolitan Road Widening Act.
·          Consideration of the inclusion of areas for deep rooted plantings on the development site.
·          An updated waste management plan.
It is strongly suggested that further engagement be made with ODASA to resolve some of the above matters.

This may be evidence that the Unley Development Plan is succeeding.

Succeeding in restricting the ad hoc development we have seen elsewhere. It certainly goes to the heart of our Development Plan and our submission to the SCAP.

Time will tell if the SCAP is not a rubber stamp.

The public face of Council has changed.

With the resignation of our Mayor and my stint as Deputy Mayor ending, the public face of Council has changed.

Last night Council appointed Cr Peter Hughes (Fullarton Ward) as our Acting Mayor. We also appointed Cr Michael Hewitson as Deputy Mayor. Their appointments will see us through to the elections in November this year. This is when you get to decide who will be your Mayor and your two Local Councillors for the next 4 years.

Peter will be the public face of Council for the next ten months. Michael will deputise in Peter’s absence. This is as was the case in the last twelve months with me deputising for Lachlan Clyne,

I wish both well.

Exacerbating this changing face of Council, Cr John Koumi announced during last night’s Council meeting that he too was resigning effective the end of this month. John’s focus has shifted in recent times with the purchase of a farm in the Adelaide Hills.

On my part my bid was unsuccessful. I am now simply again your local Ward Councillor.

This allows me to sit back a little now. Once again I can direct my focus on the rate payers of my Ward. I will also now have a greater influence in the Council Chamber, debating issues relevant to the Clarence Park Ward.

The Deputy Mayor role spreads your focus. I found myself being called into assisting with the concerns of ratepayers across the City of Unley. Responding to ratepayer concerns will largely be limited back to the Clarence Park Ward.

When replacing the Mayor at meetings the focus is in ensuring the proper flow of business and the conduct of the meeting. It was challenging when a Clarence Park Ward issue (or an issue I in which I have an interest) was discussed in the chamber.

Lachlan Clyne finally resigning as Mayor of the City of Unley

It’s Official. Lachlan Clyne is finally resigning as Mayor of the City of Unley, effective at the end of this month.

 

As most of us are aware, he is the Liberal Candidate for the seat of Badcoe in the upcoming State Election. In resigning as Mayor he can now focus all his energies on getting elected.

This has been the worst kept secret in Unley for some time now. Many amongst us believed he had already resigned. This is not the case. He was only on leave between September and November. During this time, I deputised (as Deputy Mayor) for him at Council meetings. We shared civic duties.

He returned to his Mayoral duties in December chairing the December meeting. He will chair the upcoming January meeting. Again, we shared the civic duties.

I would like, on behalf of our Community, to thank Lachlan for his service to The City of Unley. We wish you well, in whatever the future holds for you.

This Council can be proud of what it has achieved during Lachlan’s time as Mayor.

Following on from the establishment of the previous Council’s 2033 Community Plan we painstakingly master planned the various components of the plan. We have, and certainly in the more recent of times, implemented many of the plan’s initiatives.

He will be missed by many in the community of Unley.

As regular readers of this blog would know, I announced in my blog on November 27 that I have put my hand up to become our Acting Mayor in his absence.

I do so to avoid confusion for the many in our community who believed that Lachlan had already resigned as Mayor and I had taken over. I believe it is in everyone’s best interest that we present a picture of continuity and stability of community leadership.

Putting my Hand up for Mayor in Council’s January meeting.

With the pending resignation of our Mayor Lachlan Clyne I am putting my Hand up to be Mayor leading up to 2018 November local government elections.

As I have blogged previously Lachlan Clyne, our Mayor, intends to resign in January. He is doing this in his pursuit of seeking the seat of Badcoe in the March State elections. The timing of the announcement is designed to avoid a costly bi-election.

Assuming he does resign, Council will appoint from within its ranks a replacement rather there be a bi-election. Section 54 (8) of the Local Government Act refers

If a casual vacancy occurs in the office of mayor—
(a) on or after 1 January of a year in which a periodic election is due to be held
(and before polling day for that periodic election); or
(b) within 7 months before polling day for a general election (other than a
periodic election) (the date of that polling day being known at that time),
a member chosen by the council may act in the office of mayor until the conclusion of the election.

I have confirmed to my colleagues in my written report to the November Council meeting that it is my intention to nominate at the January meeting.

I do so believing that Council needs continuity in the role of Mayor. Given my involvement in the last three months, my continuing in the role until the next election will provide I believe in the eyes of the public a stable governance for Council. For stability.

I have enjoyed taking on the responsibility for filling in for the Mayor over the last three months. Continuing in the role makes sense. Rather than someone else  starting from scratch for the ensuing the mere 7 months leading up to the caretaker mode and the election.

And I have the time, the energy and the enthusiasm to give to the role. So I am putting my hand up.

Jayne Stinson engages with our local community in the Battle for Badcoe.

Hot on the heels of my blog recently on a 3rd candidate in the battle for Badcoe, endorsed Labor candidate Jayne Stinson engages with our local community in the Battle for Badcoe.

She held two public meetings yesterday. The first was held at Dora Guild Playground; the second at Page Park. I attended both.

Of interest was the presence of the President’s or immediate past presidents of three of our local premier sporting organisations.

Jayne was entertained by President Craig at the Goody Saints v University match

Goodwood Saints Football Club and Goodwood Cricket Club promoted their joint pursuit of female participation in their respective sports. Both clubs are leaders in their competitions and are active in female participation. Later Jayne spent the afternoon as guest of the Footy Club watching the “A” grade beat and pass University in the top five.

They are both keen to see renovations to the Grandstand. Renovations that are long overdue. Renovations that have become urgent given female participation in both Football and Cricket. They lobbied for grant funding for Council’s proposed upgrades.

Millswood Bowling Club and, by way of a phone call to me to promote their needs, Millswood Croquet Club promoted their respective grant funding needs. The Bowling Club is in urgent need for upgraded female toilet facilities and likewise a need for disabled facilities. The Croquet Club in need of new premises.

All four have embraced the principles of Council’s Active Unley strategy. This has resulted in the needs promoted.

Their lobbying backs up my lobbying with Jayne earlier this year.

Other issues included looking at safety of the pedestrian rail crossings at the Clarence Park Rail Station. The introduction of quieter and faster trains while removing gates has created a more dangerous environment than ever before noting this is a Station that has previously seen a death of a young child.

In the meantime, I am looking to catch up with the 3rd candidate later this week, Cr John Woodward.

What is the Value of the Trees of Unley

Yesterday I focused my blog writing on the extreme emotions around trees. Today I look at the value of the trees of Unley.

As I blogged yesterday trees, and therefore the trees of Unley, are both an asset and yet a liability.

Trees are a considerable asset to the community on many levels. They are an important element of the rich culture heritage of Unley. Our trees compliment the environment. They enhance our enjoyment of open spaces by making them more comfortable and pleasant. Just as importantly they provide a wide range of other benefits. Benefits such as shade, cooling and habitat for wildlife.

Conversely, trees constitute a potential risk to our community. There are several risks to both property and more importantly to person. The older they get the greater the risk. These risks include from both underground and aboveground.

Underground risks include movement causing damage by lifting to paths, roads and to buildings. The movement can create trip hazards in our vast footpath network. Above ground dropping limbs can cause property damage and (as highlighted yesterday) are a risk to personal safety.

Like other assets, such as buildings, trees require considered and ongoing maintenance. As with buildings this maintenance should be designed to maximise the benefits they provide and to minimise risks.

So what is the value of the trees of Unley?

Our Tree Strategy Policy 2016-19 is taking a proactive stand toward maintaining and growing our urban forest.

The core of this is recognising for an urban forest to be sustainable there must be a wide age-distribution of trees to create a cycle of succession.

Council’s urban forest has 26,000 trees. 23,000 of these trees are located in some 450 streets. The remaining 3,000 of these trees are in our parks and gardens.

A recent audit of our trees indicates that 20% of our trees realistically require replacement in the next five to ten years. More urgently 7% of our trees (1,570) will require replacement in the next 5 years.

During this time, we plan to remove 1,924 trees. More importantly we aim to plant 2,806 new trees. Rather than just replace trees we have determined are in need, we have identified opportunities to plant trees where none exist now.